Tag: Résumé

27 Things About Me that Are Not on My Resume

 

Mandy Boyle:

  1. Is an okay bowler.
  2. Used to work in a haunted house in early teens as a volunteer. (Most of the time, I worked in the beginning of the show, helping people to their seats. One year, I was cast as Freddy and got to have a choreographed “fight” with Jason. Pretty awesome. Ironically, I never actually went through said haunted house – and I still don’t like them very much in general.)
  3. Just learned how to braid and use a curling wand.
  4. Enjoys guided meditation.
  5. Wears a size 9.5 shoe.
  6. Got to sing in Carnegie Hall as part of a high school choral festival. (It was a surreal experience, and one of the coolest things I’ve ever done.)
  7. Took three years of French in high school. (I’m trying to relearn what I’ve forgotten in hopes that one day, I’ll get to put it to good use on a trip to France – or at least a French-speaking region of Canada.)
  8. Wrote a poem in 8th grade that was published in a collection from young poets. (I have one copy of the book, and it’s only because they sent it to me for free.)
  9. Acted in 4 musicals, despite my atrocious dancing skills.
  10. Would like to write a book someday.
  11. Is pretty good at crossword puzzles and cryptoquotes.
  12. Work studied in the university library for a semester in the Library System Loan Department.
  13. Enjoys cinnamon scented candles.
  14. Gives solid high fives and big hugs.
  15. Has a great recipe for meatloaf.
  16. Is able to lift slightly more than you’d think.
  17. Has a sunny disposition, although the delivery can be deadpan at times.
  18. Functions well on 7 to 8 hours of sleep per night.
  19. Is comfortable going to the movies or going out to eat alone.
  20. Ran track in high school. Usually hurdles and the 100 meter dash.
  21. Looks kind of like Anne Hathaway (according to some).
  22. Knows far too much useless trivia.
  23. Appreciates the Oxford comma.
  24. Loves  Les Miserables by Victor Hugo and has since the age of 13.
  25. Worked in a grungy movie theater – and loved it.
  26. Looks both ways before crossing the street.
  27. Is a good listener.
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Making Your Online Portfolio Stand Out

Virtual Resume & Letter
Image by Olivier Charavel via Flickr

My blog is a lot like a patchwork quilt. A little bit of writing skill here, some expertise there, and a stitch of what things interest me. It is designed to be both a form of self-expression and a portfolio, which makes it difficult to hone down exactly what I’m doing. Chances are, I fall into the huge category of young professionals trying to differentiate themselves from the competition by taking an active role in their web presences.

An online portfolio shouldn’t be dry or boring or cookie-cutter. It should pop and really speak to your strengths and personality. Over the past week, I’ve been reading about how you can make your portfolio stand out and here are some of the tips I found most helpful:

1.) Give Your Portfolio a Human Side:
a short bio of who you are, what you like, what you’re interested in, and what you’ve accomplished gives a prospective employer or client more information about you. They get a feel for who you are and what you might be like to work with. Plus, it shows you’re not just another producer of bland content.

2.) Pay Attention to Design: this is especially critical for those looking to enter an artistic or visually-driven industry. Having a killer design captures your audience and gives your portfolio a chance at standing out from the crowd. Plus, it’s another way to express your personality and reinforce personal branding.

3.) Clear, Crisp, Concise: we don’t want to be bogged down with a lengthy tale of your career history. Short, sweet, and to the point information will get your point across quickly to a prospective employer or client without making anyone feel agitated in the process. Slim and trim your paragraphs. Write actively. Keep the reader engaged and make sure your resume, case studies, or project descriptions are clean and neat.

4.) Make it Available: this is one of the biggest mistakes people make when they put a portfolio online. Either they put it in a place where it can’t easily be found or they make it difficult to share, save, or email. Make sure that your online portfolio or resume is saved in a PDF format (it’s pretty universal) and can be downloaded easily. Also, you may want to think about adding a share button so that it’s easy to email or post.

Try adding a link to your portfolio on social networks like Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, or Brazen Careerist. You can also create a button for your blog so that prospective employers and clients can find your stuff and access it easily.

5.) Show Off Your Skills: Be sure to provide a body of work that displays your talents and really speaks to your abilities. Don’t just put in one or two samples of work in the same field or genre. Try to tailor your porfolio to a specific career goal, or go all out and show a little bit of what you’re capable of. As always, only put in your best work.

However, if you’re looking for another way to be creative, try writing a blog post that features some of your not-so-best work and discuss what you learned from the experience and what you’ll do better next time. This can be a great way to show an employer that you’ve got some mad critical thinking skills and that you care about improving.

What are your favorite portfolio tips?

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